Design Considerations for Internet-Delivered Self-Management Programs for Adults With Hearing Impairment Purpose Hearing impairment (HI) is a chronic condition; thus, even with treatment, residual participation restrictions and activity limitations typically remain. Individuals must learn to self-manage their HI. The purpose of this research note is to review components of successful Internet-based self-management programs and to evaluate group auditory rehabilitation (AR) programs ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 2016
Design Considerations for Internet-Delivered Self-Management Programs for Adults With Hearing Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jill E. Preminger
    Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Disorders, University of Louisville, KY
  • Ann M. Rothpletz
    Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Disorders, University of Louisville, KY
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jill E. Preminger: jill.preminger@louisville.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor and Associate Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Special Issue: Internet and Audiology / Research Notes
Research Note   |   October 01, 2016
Design Considerations for Internet-Delivered Self-Management Programs for Adults With Hearing Impairment
American Journal of Audiology, October 2016, Vol. 25, 272-277. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0010
History: Received January 25, 2016 , Revised March 20, 2016 , Accepted April 30, 2016
 
American Journal of Audiology, October 2016, Vol. 25, 272-277. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0010
History: Received January 25, 2016; Revised March 20, 2016; Accepted April 30, 2016

Purpose Hearing impairment (HI) is a chronic condition; thus, even with treatment, residual participation restrictions and activity limitations typically remain. Individuals must learn to self-manage their HI. The purpose of this research note is to review components of successful Internet-based self-management programs and to evaluate group auditory rehabilitation (AR) programs with varying content, in order to make recommendations for the design of future Internet-based self-management programs.

Method Effect sizes for changes in HI-specific quality of life following group AR activities from 4 published studies were calculated to determine if effect size varied systematically as a function of group activities. These findings are described using a self-management framework.

Results Successful group AR activities include (a) psychosocial activities to promote role management, emotional management, and social support; (b) informational lectures and group discussion to promote education; (c) communication strategy exercises to promote self-efficacy and self-management skills; and (d) the inclusion of a frequent communication partner to promote social support and self-tailoring.

Conclusions It is recommended that future Internet-based self-management programs focus on the mechanisms of social support and education to promote learning and self-management skills. Future research will determine if these AR activities may be implemented effectively via the Internet.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this work were presented at the 2nd International Meeting on Internet & Audiology, Snekkersten, Denmark (September 2015) and the 6th Aging and Speech Communication Conference, Bloomington, IN (October 2015).
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