Usability and Online Audiological Rehabilitation Purpose This paper describes the results from the iterative development and usability testing of an online audiological rehabilitation (OAR) program. The OAR was based on previous experience with Internet interventions and OAR. Method The described OAR consisted of weekly learning modules, each of which had a specific topic ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 2016
Usability and Online Audiological Rehabilitation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elisabet Sundewall Thorén
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark
  • Julie Hefting Pedersen
    Oticon A/S, Smørum, Denmark
  • Nis Ove Jørnæs
    Oticon A/S, Smørum, Denmark
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Elisabet Sundewall Thorén: esu@eriksholm.com
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor and Associate Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Forum: Internet and Audiology / Research Notes
Research Note   |   October 01, 2016
Usability and Online Audiological Rehabilitation
American Journal of Audiology, October 2016, Vol. 25, 284-287. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0015
History: Received January 31, 2016 , Revised May 13, 2016 , Accepted May 20, 2016
 
American Journal of Audiology, October 2016, Vol. 25, 284-287. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0015
History: Received January 31, 2016; Revised May 13, 2016; Accepted May 20, 2016

Purpose This paper describes the results from the iterative development and usability testing of an online audiological rehabilitation (OAR) program. The OAR was based on previous experience with Internet interventions and OAR.

Method The described OAR consisted of weekly learning modules, each of which had a specific topic and contained information and learning activities. A virtual coach, a trained audiologist, led the participants through the modules. The participants' feedback was collected using the “think-aloud” method in which the participants gave their feedback in a structured manner.

Results The early findings from the first version of the OAR showed that participants had difficulty navigating the system. As a result of the usability testing, a second major edition of the OAR program was developed, and the participants found it easier to manage and that it enhanced the learning experience. The participants appreciated the testimonial videos as well as the option to study more in-depth material for a given subject.

Conclusions The early findings from the usability test of the program provided useful information as to how content can be developed and delivered for optimal user accessibility within the scope of OAR.

Acknowledgments
Part of this work was presented in September 2015 at the Second International Meeting on Internet & Audiology in Snekkersten, Denmark. The study is part of a project funded by the Oticon Foundation.
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