Have Cochlear Implant, Won't Have to Travel: Introducing Telemedicine to People Using Cochlear Implants Purpose This research note describes a planned project to design, implement, and evaluate remote care for adults using cochlear implants and compare their outcomes with those of individuals following the standard care pathway. Method Sixty people with cochlear implants will be recruited and randomized to either the remote ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 2016
Have Cochlear Implant, Won't Have to Travel: Introducing Telemedicine to People Using Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Helen Cullington
    University of Southampton Auditory Implant Service, Highfield, United Kingdom
  • Padraig Kitterick
    National Institute for Health Research Nottingham, Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, United Kingdom
  • Lisa DeBold
    Cochlear Europe Ltd., Surrey, United Kingdom
  • Mark Weal
    University of Southampton School of Electronics and Computer Science, Highfield, United Kingdom
  • Nicholas Clarke
    Southampton Business School, Highfield, United Kingdom
  • Eva Newberry
    Service user, University of Southampton Auditory Implant Service, Highfield, United Kingdom
  • Lisa Aubert
    Cochlear Europe Ltd., Surrey, United Kingdom
  • Disclosure: The first author performs occasional private consultancy work for the cochlear implant company Cochlear Europe. The second author is in receipt of grant funding from Cochlear Europe for a multicenter trial of cochlear implantation in patients with unilateral deafness and for a feasibility study of a new implantable hearing implant. University of Southampton receives research consultancy funding from Advanced Bionics.
    Disclosure: The first author performs occasional private consultancy work for the cochlear implant company Cochlear Europe. The second author is in receipt of grant funding from Cochlear Europe for a multicenter trial of cochlear implantation in patients with unilateral deafness and for a feasibility study of a new implantable hearing implant. University of Southampton receives research consultancy funding from Advanced Bionics. ×
  • Correspondence to Helen Cullington: H.Cullington@Southampton.ac.uk
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor and Associate Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Special Issue: Internet and Audiology / Research Notes
Research Note   |   October 01, 2016
Have Cochlear Implant, Won't Have to Travel: Introducing Telemedicine to People Using Cochlear Implants
American Journal of Audiology, October 2016, Vol. 25, 299-302. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0018
History: Received February 2, 2016 , Revised May 6, 2016 , Accepted May 20, 2016
 
American Journal of Audiology, October 2016, Vol. 25, 299-302. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0018
History: Received February 2, 2016; Revised May 6, 2016; Accepted May 20, 2016

Purpose This research note describes a planned project to design, implement, and evaluate remote care for adults using cochlear implants and compare their outcomes with those of individuals following the standard care pathway.

Method Sixty people with cochlear implants will be recruited and randomized to either the remote care group or a control group. The remote care group will use new tools for 6 months: remote and self-monitoring, self-adjustment of device, and a personalized online support tool. The main outcome measure is patient empowerment, with secondary outcomes of stability in hearing and quality of life, patient and clinician preference, and use of clinic resources.

Conclusion The clinical trial ends in summer 2016. Remote care may offer a viable method of follow-up for some adults with cochlear implants.

Acknowledgments
This work is funded by The Health Foundation Innovating for Improvement Award 1959 (awarded to Helen Cullington). This research note summarizes an oral presentation made at the Second International Meeting on Internet and Audiology in 2015. Similar work was also presented at the 12th European Symposium on Pediatric Cochlear Implants in 2015 and subsequently has been accepted as a protocol paper in BMJ Open (Cullington et al., 2016). We thank the people with cochlear implants who give so freely of their time and experience to further cochlear implant research. Marta Glowacka has provided great expertise in LifeGuide programming. Thanks to Dean Parker from Action on Hearing Loss for providing the Triple Digit Test interface.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access