Internet Competency Predicts Practical Hearing Aid Knowledge and Skills in First-Time Hearing Aid Users Purpose The purpose of the study was to assess whether Internet competency predicted practical hearing aid knowledge and handling skills in first-time hearing aid users. Method The design was a prospective, randomized controlled trial of a multimedia educational intervention consisting of interactive video tutorials (or reusable learning objects ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 2016
Internet Competency Predicts Practical Hearing Aid Knowledge and Skills in First-Time Hearing Aid Users
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Maidment
    NIHR Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom
  • William Brassington
    Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom
  • Heather Wharrad
    School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom
  • Melanie Ferguson
    NIHR Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom
    Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom
  • Disclosure: The Nottingham University Hospitals National Health Service Trust and University of Nottingham will receive a proportion of any royalties from the sale of the C2Hear reusable learning objects (DVD format).
    Disclosure: The Nottingham University Hospitals National Health Service Trust and University of Nottingham will receive a proportion of any royalties from the sale of the C2Hear reusable learning objects (DVD format). ×
  • Correspondence to Melanie Ferguson: Melanie.Ferguson@nottingham.ac.uk
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor and Associate Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Research Forum: Internet and Audiology / Research Notes
Research Note   |   October 01, 2016
Internet Competency Predicts Practical Hearing Aid Knowledge and Skills in First-Time Hearing Aid Users
American Journal of Audiology, October 2016, Vol. 25, 303-307. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0022
History: Received February 4, 2016 , Revised May 13, 2016 , Accepted May 20, 2016
 
American Journal of Audiology, October 2016, Vol. 25, 303-307. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0022
History: Received February 4, 2016; Revised May 13, 2016; Accepted May 20, 2016

Purpose The purpose of the study was to assess whether Internet competency predicted practical hearing aid knowledge and handling skills in first-time hearing aid users.

Method The design was a prospective, randomized controlled trial of a multimedia educational intervention consisting of interactive video tutorials (or reusable learning objects [RLOs]). RLOs were delivered through DVD for TV or PC, and online. Internet competency was measured at the hearing aid fitting appointment, whereas hearing aid knowledge and practical handling skills were assessed 6 weeks postfitting.

Results Internet competency predicted practical hearing aid knowledge and handling skills, controlling for age, hearing sensitivity, educational status, and gender for the group that received the RLOs. Internet competency was inversely related to the number of times the RLOs were watched.

Conclusion Associations between Internet competency and practical hearing aid knowledge, handling skills, and watching the RLOs fewer times may have arisen because of improved self-efficacy. Therefore, first-time hearing aid users who are more competent Internet users may be better equipped to apply newly learned information to effectively manage their hearing loss.

Acknowledgments
Part of this work was presented at the Second International Meeting on Internet and Audiology, Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark, September 24–25, 2015. This article presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research under its Research for Patient Benefit Program (Grant Reference Number PB-PG-0909-20294). The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the National Health Service, the National Institute for Health Research or the UK Department of Health. We thank the research team members Marian Brandreth, Holly Thomas, Paul Leighton, James Henderson, and Michael Taylor. In addition, we gratefully acknowledge the audiologists at Nottingham Audiology Services who recruited the patients, as well as our patient and public involvement panel (Anne Darby, Tina Wales, and Rachel Ravenlock).
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