Using Cognitive Screening Tests in Audiology Purpose The population of the United States is aging. Those older adults are living longer than ever and have an increased desire for social participation. As a result, audiologists are likely to see an increased demand for service by older clients whose communication difficulty is caused by a combination of ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   December 01, 2016
Using Cognitive Screening Tests in Audiology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jing Shen
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Melinda C. Anderson
    University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Kathryn H. Arehart
    University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Pamela E. Souza
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jing Shen: jing.shen@northwestern.edu
  • Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Associate Editor: Ryan McCreery
    Associate Editor: Ryan McCreery×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   December 01, 2016
Using Cognitive Screening Tests in Audiology
American Journal of Audiology, December 2016, Vol. 25, 319-331. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0032
History: Received March 8, 2016 , Revised May 25, 2016 , Accepted June 3, 2016
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2016, Vol. 25, 319-331. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0032
History: Received March 8, 2016; Revised May 25, 2016; Accepted June 3, 2016

Purpose The population of the United States is aging. Those older adults are living longer than ever and have an increased desire for social participation. As a result, audiologists are likely to see an increased demand for service by older clients whose communication difficulty is caused by a combination of hearing loss and cognitive impairment. For these individuals, early detection of mild cognitive impairment is critical for providing timely medical intervention and social support.

Method This tutorial provides information about cognition of older adults, mild cognitive impairment, and cognitive screening tests, with the purpose of assisting audiologists in identifying and appropriately referring potential cases of cognitive impairment.

Results Topics addressed also include how to administer cognitive screening tests on individuals with hearing loss, how to use test results in audiology practice, and the potential of using cognitive screening tests for evaluating the benefit of clinical interventions.

Conclusions As health care professionals who serve the aging population, audiologists are likely to encounter cases of undiagnosed cognitive impairment. In order to provide timely referral for medical assistance as well as an optimized individual outcome of audiologic interventions, audiologists should be trained to recognize an abnormality in older clients' cognitive status.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health Grants R01DC012289 (awarded to Pamela E. Souza and Kathryn H. Arehart) and F32DC014629 (awarded to Jing Shen). The authors thank Tim Schoof, Cynthia Erdos, and Paul Reinhart for comments on the manuscript and Fernanda Heitor for helpful conversation regarding this topic. A portion of the data was presented at the American Auditory Society Meeting 2015, Scottsdale, AZ.
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