A Retrospective Examination of the Effect of Diabetes on Sensory Processing in Older Adults Purpose The purpose of this article is to examine retrospectively the impact of diabetes mellitus on auditory, visual, and tactile processing in older adults. Method Fourteen (10.4%) of a sample of 135 older adults self-reported the presence of diabetes mellitus in a study of sensory and cognitive processing ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 2016
A Retrospective Examination of the Effect of Diabetes on Sensory Processing in Older Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Larry E. Humes
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Larry Humes: humes@indiana.edu
  • Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Associate Editor: Ann Eddins
    Associate Editor: Ann Eddins×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research Notes
Research Note   |   December 01, 2016
A Retrospective Examination of the Effect of Diabetes on Sensory Processing in Older Adults
American Journal of Audiology, December 2016, Vol. 25, 364-367. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0034
History: Received March 9, 2016 , Revised July 11, 2016 , Accepted August 5, 2016
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2016, Vol. 25, 364-367. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0034
History: Received March 9, 2016; Revised July 11, 2016; Accepted August 5, 2016

Purpose The purpose of this article is to examine retrospectively the impact of diabetes mellitus on auditory, visual, and tactile processing in older adults.

Method Fourteen (10.4%) of a sample of 135 older adults self-reported the presence of diabetes mellitus in a study of sensory and cognitive processing across the adult lifespan. In this study, the performance of the subgroup with diabetes on a number of psychophysical sensory-processing measures was compared with that of the 121 older adults without diabetes. Measures of sensory processing focused on temporal processing and threshold sensitivity in each of 3 sensory modalities: hearing, vision, and touch.

Results The subgroup of older adults with diabetes differed significantly (p < .05) from the larger group without diabetes only for measures of auditory temporal-order and temporal-masking identification tasks.

Conclusion This retrospective study provides additional evidence in support of higher level auditory-processing deficits in older adults with a positive history of diabetes mellitus.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by research grant from the National Institute on Aging, R01 AG008293. The author thanks Lauren Calandruccio for her assistance with the creation of the boxplots in Figure 1.
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