Improving Art Museum Accessibility for Adults With Acquired Hearing Loss Purpose Adults with hearing loss rated the accessibility of guided or docent-led art museum tours with and without hearing assistive technology (HAT). Method Nineteen individuals (average age 64 years, range 35–87 years) with acquired hearing loss participated. All participants had a bilateral hearing loss (mild to profound) using ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   March 01, 2017
Improving Art Museum Accessibility for Adults With Acquired Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susanna Meyer
    Communication Sciences & Disorders Department, Worcester State University, MA
  • Linda Larrivee
    Communication Sciences & Disorders Department, Worcester State University, MA
  • Ann Veneziano-Korzec
    Communication Sciences & Disorders Department, Worcester State University, MA
  • Katrina Stacy
    Worcester Art Museum, MA
  • Disclosure: Susanna Meyer, Linda Larrivee, and Ann Veneziano-Korzec are employees of Worcester State University, and Katrina Stacy is an employee of the Worcester Art Museum. The study was funded through WSU/WAM Partnership Planning Grants.
    Disclosure: Susanna Meyer, Linda Larrivee, and Ann Veneziano-Korzec are employees of Worcester State University, and Katrina Stacy is an employee of the Worcester Art Museum. The study was funded through WSU/WAM Partnership Planning Grants. ×
  • Correspondence to Susanna Meyer: smeyer@worcester.edu
  • Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Associate Editor: Owen Murnane
    Associate Editor: Owen Murnane×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   March 01, 2017
Improving Art Museum Accessibility for Adults With Acquired Hearing Loss
American Journal of Audiology, March 2017, Vol. 26, 10-17. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-15-0084
History: Received December 24, 2015 , Revised May 4, 2016 , Accepted October 7, 2016
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 2017, Vol. 26, 10-17. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-15-0084
History: Received December 24, 2015; Revised May 4, 2016; Accepted October 7, 2016

Purpose Adults with hearing loss rated the accessibility of guided or docent-led art museum tours with and without hearing assistive technology (HAT).

Method Nineteen individuals (average age 64 years, range 35–87 years) with acquired hearing loss participated. All participants had a bilateral hearing loss (mild to profound) using hearing aids (n = 12), cochlear implants (n = 5), or no technology (n = 2). Two docents who were previously trained to modify their presentations and use clear speech led the tours. Participants experienced a tour with and without the museum's HAT and rated its effectiveness using a rating scale. The study used a pre–post test design.

Results The docent-led tours with HAT were rated significantly higher (p = .003) than the tours without HAT. Participants made several suggestions on improving museum accessibility for individuals with hearing loss.

Conclusions The use of HAT during a museum tour was beneficial for individuals with hearing loss. Training docents to modify their presentations, use clear speech, and HAT improved the accessibility of docent-led tours for individuals with hearing loss.

Acknowledgments
The study was funded by the Worcester State University/Worcester Art Museum Partnership Planning Grants (awarded to Susanna Meyer). The contributions of Worcester Art Museum's Jan Ewick as well as the two docents are gratefully acknowledged. Ashley Lameiras is thanked for her assistance in data management and Susan Rezen for her editing.
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