Child–Adult Differences in Using Dual-Task Paradigms to Measure Listening Effort Purpose The purpose of the project was to investigate the effects modifying the secondary task in a dual-task paradigm to measure objective listening effort. To be specific, the complexity and depth of processing were increased relative to a simple secondary task. Method Three dual-task paradigms were developed for ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   March 27, 2017
Child–Adult Differences in Using Dual-Task Paradigms to Measure Listening Effort
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erin M. Picou
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville TN
  • Lauren M. Charles
    Department of Allied Health Sciences Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Todd A. Ricketts
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville TN
  • Disclosure: This research was funded by Sonova, the Maddox Charitable Trust, and through a training grant which provided some financial support to the second author (NIH NIDCD T35DC008763; Linda Hood, PI).
    Disclosure: This research was funded by Sonova, the Maddox Charitable Trust, and through a training grant which provided some financial support to the second author (NIH NIDCD T35DC008763; Linda Hood, PI). ×
  • Lauren M. Charles is now at Children's Hospital Colorado, Denver, CO.
    Lauren M. Charles is now at Children's Hospital Colorado, Denver, CO.×
  • Correspondence to Erin M. Picou: erin.picou@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Associate Editor: Ryan McCreery
    Associate Editor: Ryan McCreery×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   March 27, 2017
Child–Adult Differences in Using Dual-Task Paradigms to Measure Listening Effort
American Journal of Audiology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0059
History: Received June 11, 2016 , Revised October 22, 2016 , Accepted December 8, 2016
 
American Journal of Audiology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0059
History: Received June 11, 2016; Revised October 22, 2016; Accepted December 8, 2016

Purpose The purpose of the project was to investigate the effects modifying the secondary task in a dual-task paradigm to measure objective listening effort. To be specific, the complexity and depth of processing were increased relative to a simple secondary task.

Method Three dual-task paradigms were developed for school-age children. The primary task was word recognition. The secondary task was a physical response to a visual probe (simple task), a physical response to a complex probe (increased complexity), or word categorization (increased depth of processing). Sixteen adults (22–32 years, M = 25.4) and 22 children (9–17 years, M = 13.2) were tested using the 3 paradigms in quiet and noise.

Results For both groups, manipulations of the secondary task did not affect word recognition performance. For adults, increasing depth of processing increased the calculated effect of noise; however, for children, results with the deep secondary task were the least stable.

Conclusions Manipulations of the secondary task differentially affected adults and children. Consistent with previous findings, increased depth of processing enhanced paradigm sensitivity for adults. However, younger participants were more likely to demonstrate the expected effects of noise on listening effort using a secondary task that did not require deep processing.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank Laura Fels for her tireless efforts recruiting participants and collecting data. Portions of this article were presented at American Academy of Audiology-North Carolina (AAA-NC) Fall Conference (October 2014), at the Scientific and Technical Conference of the American Auditory Society (March 2015) in Scottsdale, AZ, and at the Acoustical Society of America meeting (May 2015) in Pittsburgh, PA. This work was funded by Sonova and Maddox Charitable Trust. In addition, a training grant provided some financial support to the second author (NIH NIDCD T35DC008763; PI: Linda Hood).
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access