Exploring Audiologists' Language and Hearing Aid Uptake in Initial Rehabilitation Appointments Purpose The study aimed (a) to profile audiologists' language during the diagnosis and management planning phase of hearing assessment appointments and (b) to explore associations between audiologists' language and patients' decisions to obtain hearing aids. Method Sixty-two audiologist–patient dyads participated. Patient participants were aged 55 years or older. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 13, 2017
Exploring Audiologists' Language and Hearing Aid Uptake in Initial Rehabilitation Appointments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anna Sciacca
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Carly Meyer
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
    The HEARing CRC, Carlton, Victoria, Australia
  • Katie Ekberg
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Caitlin Barr
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Louise Hickson
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
    The HEARing CRC, Carlton, Victoria, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Carly Meyer: carly.meyer@uq.edu.au
  • Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Associate Editor: Ryan McCreery
    Associate Editor: Ryan McCreery×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 13, 2017
Exploring Audiologists' Language and Hearing Aid Uptake in Initial Rehabilitation Appointments
American Journal of Audiology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 110-118. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-16-0061
History: Received June 23, 2016 , Revised October 4, 2016 , Accepted November 15, 2016
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2017, Vol. 26, 110-118. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-16-0061
History: Received June 23, 2016; Revised October 4, 2016; Accepted November 15, 2016

Purpose The study aimed (a) to profile audiologists' language during the diagnosis and management planning phase of hearing assessment appointments and (b) to explore associations between audiologists' language and patients' decisions to obtain hearing aids.

Method Sixty-two audiologist–patient dyads participated. Patient participants were aged 55 years or older. Hearing assessment appointments were audiovisually recorded and transcribed for analysis. Audiologists' language was profiled using two measures: general language complexity and use of jargon. A binomial, multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to investigate the associations between these language measures and hearing aid uptake.

Results The logistic regression model revealed that the Flesch–Kincaid reading grade level of audiologists' language was significantly associated with hearing aid uptake. Patients were less likely to obtain hearing aids when audiologists' language was at a higher reading grade level. No associations were found between audiologists' use of jargon and hearing aid uptake.

Conclusions Audiologists' use of complex language may present a barrier for patients to understand hearing rehabilitation recommendations. Reduced understanding may limit patient participation in the decision-making process and result in patients being less willing to trial hearing aids. Clear, concise language is recommended to facilitate shared decision making.

Acknowledgments
The authors sincerely thank all participants involved in the study. The authors acknowledge the financial support and management of the HEARing CRC, established and supported under Business Australia's Cooperative Research Centres Program, an initiative of the Australian Government.
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