Fit-to-Targets for the Desired Sensation Level Version 5.0a Hearing Aid Prescription Method for Children Purpose The purpose of this study was to measure the range of fit to Desired Sensation Level version 5.0 (DSL v5.0) targets in pediatric practice environments. Results will be used in the future to develop clinical-aided speech intelligibility index typical performance data. Method Clinical partners collected data from ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 18, 2017
Fit-to-Targets for the Desired Sensation Level Version 5.0a Hearing Aid Prescription Method for Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sheila T. F. Moodie
    National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  • Susan D. Scollie
    National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  • Marlene P. Bagatto
    National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  • Kelley Keene
    ListenUP! Canada, Peterborough, Ontario
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Sheila T. F. Moodie: sheila@nca.uwo.ca
  • Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Associate Editor: Ryan McCreery
    Associate Editor: Ryan McCreery×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 18, 2017
Fit-to-Targets for the Desired Sensation Level Version 5.0a Hearing Aid Prescription Method for Children
American Journal of Audiology, September 2017, Vol. 26, 251-258. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-16-0054
History: Received May 19, 2016 , Revised October 31, 2016 , Accepted November 22, 2016
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2017, Vol. 26, 251-258. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-16-0054
History: Received May 19, 2016; Revised October 31, 2016; Accepted November 22, 2016

Purpose The purpose of this study was to measure the range of fit to Desired Sensation Level version 5.0 (DSL v5.0) targets in pediatric practice environments. Results will be used in the future to develop clinical-aided speech intelligibility index typical performance data.

Method Clinical partners collected data from 161 final hearing aid settings for children aged ≤ 10 years. Measured data were obtained by performing 2-cm3 coupler-simulated real-ear measurements using the DSL v5.0 implementation on the Audioscan VF-1 (Etymonic Design Inc., Dorchester, ON, Canada) for soft, average, and loud speech inputs and maximum hearing aid output levels.

Results Fittings were within ± 5-dB root-mean-square (RMS) error of target for 77%, 80%, and 82% of fittings for the soft, medium, and loud speech test levels, respectively. Aided maximum power output measures were within ± 5-dB RMS error in 72% of cases. Degree of hearing loss, test frequency, and frequency by test level were significant factors in deviation from target. The range of aided speech intelligibility index values exhibited a strong correlation with the hearing levels of the children tested.

Conclusion This study provides evidence that typical hearing aid fittings for children can be achieved within ± 5-dB RMS error of the DSL v5.0 target. Greater target deviations were observed at extreme frequencies and as the severity of hearing loss increased.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported with funding by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (Grant 200710CGD-188113-171346 to Sheila Moodie, and Grant 200811CGV-204713-174463 to Marlene Bagatto). This work has also been supported by Starkey Laboratories, Inc., Eden Prairie, Minnesota, and The Masonic Foundation of Ontario, Help-2-Hear Project, Ontario, Canada.
The authors acknowledge with appreciation the collaborative efforts of the Network of Pediatric Audiologists of Canada for their significant contributions to this work, including: Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Audiology, Ottawa, Ontario; Community Audiology Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia; Ear & Hearing Clinic, Kitchener, Ontario; Fraser Health (South Region) Public Health Hearing Clinic, Surrey, British Columbia; Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta; H. A. Leeper Speech & Hearing Clinic, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario; Hamilton Health Sciences, Audiology Department, Hamilton, Ontario; Humber River Hospital, Audiology Department, Toronto, Ontario; Nova Scotia Hearing and Speech Centres, Truro and Halifax, Nova Scotia; SickKids Hospital, Communication Sciences & Disorders Department, Toronto, Ontario; Montréal Children's Hospital, Montréal, Québec; Vancouver Community Audiology Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia; Central Speech and Hearing Clinic, Winnipeg, Manitoba; Deer Lodge Hearing Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba; and Janeway Children's Health & Rehabilitation Centre, St. John's, Newfoundland. The authors also acknowledge the contribution of Tim Trine from Starkey Laboratories, Inc. We also thank Jacob Sulkers for his assistance in manuscript preparation.
Portions of this work have been previously presented to the Network of Pediatric Audiologists of Canada clinicians, at the Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth Services Infant Hearing Program training sessions, and on Audiology Online: http://www.audiologyonline.com/ceus/recordedcoursedetails.asp?class_id=14898
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