Progressive Tinnitus Management Level 3 Skills Education: A 5-Year Clinical Retrospective Purpose The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether progressive tinnitus management Level 3 skills education workshops conducted at the Bay Pines and Boston Veterans Affairs hospitals result in consistent use of the presented tinnitus management strategies by patients 1–5 years after completing the workshops. Method ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   September 18, 2017
Progressive Tinnitus Management Level 3 Skills Education: A 5-Year Clinical Retrospective
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Catherine M. Edmonds
    Audiology and Speech Pathology Service, Bay Pines VA Health Care System, FL
  • Cheri Ribbe
    Audiology and Speech Pathology Service, Boston VA Health Care System, MA
  • Emily J. Thielman
    Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research & Development, National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, VA Portland Health Care System, OR
  • James A. Henry
    Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research & Development, National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, VA Portland Health Care System, OR
    Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland
  • Cheri Ribbe is now at the VA Central Western Massachusetts Health Care System
    Cheri Ribbe is now at the VA Central Western Massachusetts Health Care System×
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Catherine M. Edmonds: catherine.edmonds@va.gov
  • Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Associate Editor: Owen Murnane
    Associate Editor: Owen Murnane×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   September 18, 2017
Progressive Tinnitus Management Level 3 Skills Education: A 5-Year Clinical Retrospective
American Journal of Audiology, September 2017, Vol. 26, 242-250. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-16-0085
History: Received September 8, 2016 , Revised December 17, 2016 , Accepted April 24, 2017
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2017, Vol. 26, 242-250. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-16-0085
History: Received September 8, 2016; Revised December 17, 2016; Accepted April 24, 2017

Purpose The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether progressive tinnitus management Level 3 skills education workshops conducted at the Bay Pines and Boston Veterans Affairs hospitals result in consistent use of the presented tinnitus management strategies by patients 1–5 years after completing the workshops.

Method In fiscal year (FY) 2015, the tinnitus workshop follow-up form was mailed to all veterans who completed the Level 3 workshops between FY 2010 and FY 2014. Data were compiled to determine which, if any, of the skills taught in the workshops were being used 1–5 years after completion of the workshops and the impact on quality-of-life indicators.

Results All self-management skills were being utilized up to 5 years postcompletion; therapeutic sound was utilized the most. The majority of patients reported an improved ability to manage reactions to tinnitus and improved quality-of-life indicators. Over 90% of patients from both sites recommended the program to others with tinnitus.

Conclusion The self-management skills taught in the progressive tinnitus management Level 3 workshops are sustained over time even when limited resources prevent the full complement of workshops or the involvement of mental health services. The workshops can also be successfully implemented through remote delivery via videoconferencing (telehealth).

Supplemental Materials https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5370883

Acknowledgments
J. A. Henry is supported by Research Career Scientist award C9247S provided by the Veterans Affairs (VA) Rehabilitation Research & Development Service. The material in this clinical focus is the result of work supported with resources and the use of facilities at the Bay Pines and Boston VA Health Care Systems (VAHCSs). The contents of this clinical focus do not represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. Government. The authors acknowledge Michelle Menendez (Chief of Audiology & Speech Pathology Services, Bay Pines VAHCS) and Anne Hogan (Chief of Audiology & Speech Pathology Services, Boston VAHCS) for supporting this project. Thanks also go to Kathleen Carlson and Kelly Reavis for important contributions to this clinical focus. We express our sincere appreciation to our veteran patients who have served our country and who provided innumerable insights for managing tinnitus.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access