Subjective Fatigue in Children With Hearing Loss Assessed Using Self- and Parent-Proxy Report Purpose The primary purposes of this study were to examine the effects of hearing loss and respondent type (self- vs. parent-proxy report) on subjective fatigue in children. We also examined associations between child-specific factors and fatigue ratings. Method Subjective fatigue was assessed using the Pediatric Quality of Life ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 12, 2017
Subjective Fatigue in Children With Hearing Loss Assessed Using Self- and Parent-Proxy Report
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Benjamin W. Y. Hornsby
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Samantha J. Gustafson
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Hope Lancaster
    College of Health Solutions, Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Sun-Joo Cho
    Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Stephen Camarata
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Fred H. Bess
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Benjamin W. Y. Hornsby: ben.hornsby@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar×
Article Information
Development / Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Special Issue: Select Papers From the Hearing Across the Lifespan (HEAL) 2016 Conference / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 12, 2017
Subjective Fatigue in Children With Hearing Loss Assessed Using Self- and Parent-Proxy Report
American Journal of Audiology, October 2017, Vol. 26, 393-407. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0007
History: Received January 24, 2017 , Revised May 31, 2017 , Accepted June 19, 2017
 
American Journal of Audiology, October 2017, Vol. 26, 393-407. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0007
History: Received January 24, 2017; Revised May 31, 2017; Accepted June 19, 2017

Purpose The primary purposes of this study were to examine the effects of hearing loss and respondent type (self- vs. parent-proxy report) on subjective fatigue in children. We also examined associations between child-specific factors and fatigue ratings.

Method Subjective fatigue was assessed using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Multidimensional Fatigue Scale (PedsQL-MFS; Varni, Burwinkle, Katz, Meeske, & Dickinson, 2002). We compared self- and parent-proxy ratings from 60 children with hearing loss (CHL) and 43 children with normal hearing (CNH). The children ranged in age from 6 to 12 years.

Results School-age CHL experienced more overall and cognitive fatigue than CNH, although the differences were smaller than previously reported. Parent-proxy report was not strongly associated with child self-report, and parents tended to underestimate their child's fatigue, particularly sleep/rest fatigue. Language ability was also associated with subjective fatigue. For CHL and CNH, as language abilities increased, cognitive fatigue decreased.

Conclusions School-age CHL experience more subjective fatigue than CNH. The poor association between parent-proxy and child reports suggests that the parent-proxy version of the PedsQL-MFS should not be used in isolation when assessing fatigue in school-age children. Future research should examine how language abilities may modulate fatigue and its potential academic consequences in CHL.

Acknowledgments
The research reported here was supported by the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education Grant R324A110266, awarded to Bess, PI of Vanderbilt University; by National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Grant P30HD15052, awarded to the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development; by Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research Grant UL1 TR000445 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences/National Institutes of Health; and by the Dan and Margaret Maddox Charitable Fund. We gratefully acknowledge the children and parents who participated in this study as well as the many Vanderbilt undergraduate and graduate students who generously assisted with this research. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not represent views of the Institute of Education Sciences, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Department of Education.
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