A “Goldilocks” Approach to Hearing-Aid Self-Fitting: User Interactions Purpose The purpose of the current study was to evaluate user reactions to custom software designed for self-adjustment of amplification. Method “Goldilocks” software was developed to allow user exploration and selection of preferred levels of overall output, low-frequency cut, and high-frequency boost while listening to preprocessed speech. Thirteen ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 12, 2017
A “Goldilocks” Approach to Hearing-Aid Self-Fitting: User Interactions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Arthur Boothroyd
    San Diego State University, CA
  • Carol Mackersie
    San Diego State University, CA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Arthur Boothroyd: aboothroyd@sdsu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Special Issue: Select Papers From the Hearing Across the Lifespan (HEAL) 2016 Conference / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 12, 2017
A “Goldilocks” Approach to Hearing-Aid Self-Fitting: User Interactions
American Journal of Audiology, October 2017, Vol. 26, 430-435. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-16-0125
History: Received December 14, 2016 , Revised May 4, 2017 , Accepted May 16, 2017
 
American Journal of Audiology, October 2017, Vol. 26, 430-435. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-16-0125
History: Received December 14, 2016; Revised May 4, 2017; Accepted May 16, 2017

Purpose The purpose of the current study was to evaluate user reactions to custom software designed for self-adjustment of amplification.

Method “Goldilocks” software was developed to allow user exploration and selection of preferred levels of overall output, low-frequency cut, and high-frequency boost while listening to preprocessed speech. Thirteen hearing-aid users and 13 nonusers self-adjusted before and after taking a speech perception test incorporated into the software.

Results All 26 participants were able to complete the 2 adjustments and the intervening test in an average of 6.5 min—20 of them from on-screen instructions without experimenter help. Relative to a generic starting condition, the average participant opted to increase overall output, reduce low-frequency cut, and increase high-frequency boost. The first and second self-selected values were highly correlated, but there was evidence of further increases of overall volume and high-frequency boost after speech perception testing with the initial adjustment. There was no evidence that prior hearing-aid experience affected the ability to understand or complete the self-fitting process.

Conclusions This approach to hearing-aid self-fitting can be a speedy, reliable, and feasible alternative to, or supplement to, conventional fitting procedures, but many questions remain to be answered.

Acknowledgment
Research funded by NIH Grant 1R21DC015046 to San Diego State University, Dr. Carol Mackersie, principal investigator, with subaward to University of California San Diego, Dr. Hari Garudadri, principal investigator.
AuD students Alex Lithgow and Mark Datuin assisted with participant testing. AuD students Gregory Hobbs and Jason Duda assisted with analysis of user adjustment steps.
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