The Effect of Adaptive Nonlinear Frequency Compression on Phoneme Perception Purpose This study implemented a fitting method, developed for use with frequency lowering hearing aids, across multiple testing sites, participants, and hearing aid conditions to evaluate speech perception with a novel type of frequency lowering. Method A total of 8 participants, including children and young adults, participated in ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   November 09, 2017
The Effect of Adaptive Nonlinear Frequency Compression on Phoneme Perception
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Danielle Glista
    Child Amplification Laboratory, National Centre for Audiology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  • Marianne Hawkins
    Child Amplification Laboratory, National Centre for Audiology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  • Andrea Bohnert
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Division of Communication Disorders, University Medicine of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany
  • Julia Rehmann
    Phonak AG, Staefa, Switzerland
  • Jace Wolfe
    Hearts for Hearing, Oklahoma City
  • Susan Scollie
    Child Amplification Laboratory, National Centre for Audiology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  • Disclosure: Funding to support this work was provided by Phonak AG. Julia Rehmann is an employee of Phonak AG. Susan Scollie, Jace Wolfe, and Andrea Bohnert are members of the Phonak Pediatric Advisory Board.
    Disclosure: Funding to support this work was provided by Phonak AG. Julia Rehmann is an employee of Phonak AG. Susan Scollie, Jace Wolfe, and Andrea Bohnert are members of the Phonak Pediatric Advisory Board. ×
  • Correspondence to Danielle Glista: daglista@nca.uwo.ca
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Editor: Ryan McCreery
    Editor: Ryan McCreery×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   November 09, 2017
The Effect of Adaptive Nonlinear Frequency Compression on Phoneme Perception
American Journal of Audiology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0023
History: Received March 8, 2017 , Revised July 6, 2017 , Accepted July 12, 2017
 
American Journal of Audiology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0023
History: Received March 8, 2017; Revised July 6, 2017; Accepted July 12, 2017

Purpose This study implemented a fitting method, developed for use with frequency lowering hearing aids, across multiple testing sites, participants, and hearing aid conditions to evaluate speech perception with a novel type of frequency lowering.

Method A total of 8 participants, including children and young adults, participated in real-world hearing aid trials. A blinded crossover design, including posttrial withdrawal testing, was used to assess aided phoneme perception. The hearing aid conditions included adaptive nonlinear frequency compression (NFC), static NFC, and conventional processing.

Results Enabling either adaptive NFC or static NFC improved group-level detection and recognition results for some high-frequency phonemes, when compared with conventional processing. Mean results for the distinction component of the Phoneme Perception Test (Schmitt, Winkler, Boretzki, & Holube, 2016) were similar to those obtained with conventional processing.

Conclusions Findings suggest that both types of NFC tested in this study provided a similar amount of speech perception benefit, when compared with group-level performance with conventional hearing aid technology. Individual-level results are presented with discussion around patterns of results that differ from the group average.

Acknowledgments
Funding to support this work was provided by Phonak AG. Julia Rehmann is an employee of Phonak AG. Susan Scollie, Jace Wolfe, and Andrea Bohnert are members of the Phonak Pediatric Advisory Board. Results from study were in part presented at A Sound Foundation through Early Amplification, 7th International Pediatric Conference, Atlanta, USA, 2016.
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