Improving Hearing Aid Self-Efficacy and Utility Through Revising a Hearing Aid User Guide: A Pilot Study Purpose This pilot study aimed to investigate whether revising a hearing aid user guide (HAUG) is associated with improved hearing aid self-efficacy and utility performance. Method In Part 1, an HAUG was evaluated using the Suitability Assessment of Material (SAM) and readability formulas (Flesch Reading Ease [Flesch, 1943 ], ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   December 08, 2017
Improving Hearing Aid Self-Efficacy and Utility Through Revising a Hearing Aid User Guide: A Pilot Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alexandra McMullan
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Rebecca J. Kelly-Campbell
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Kim Wise
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Rebecca J. Kelly-Campbell: rebecca.kelly@canterbury.ac.nz
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Editor: Ryan McCreery
    Editor: Ryan McCreery×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   December 08, 2017
Improving Hearing Aid Self-Efficacy and Utility Through Revising a Hearing Aid User Guide: A Pilot Study
American Journal of Audiology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0035
History: Received April 3, 2017 , Revised July 23, 2017 , Accepted July 26, 2017
 
American Journal of Audiology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0035
History: Received April 3, 2017; Revised July 23, 2017; Accepted July 26, 2017

Purpose This pilot study aimed to investigate whether revising a hearing aid user guide (HAUG) is associated with improved hearing aid self-efficacy and utility performance.

Method In Part 1, an HAUG was evaluated using the Suitability Assessment of Material (SAM) and readability formulas (Flesch Reading Ease [Flesch, 1943 ], Flesch-Kincaid Readability Formula [Kincaid, Fishburne, Rogers, & Chissom, 1957 ], and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook [McLaughlin, 1969 ]). The HAUG was revised using results from the SAM and best practice guidelines. The revision included generating a video. In Part 2, 30 adults with hearing impairment were randomly assigned to use either the original guide (N = 15) or the revised guide and video (N = 15) to perform a utility task. Participants' self-efficacy was measured using the Basic and Advanced Handling subscales of the Measure of Audiologic Rehabilitation Self-Efficacy for Hearing Aids questionnaire. SAM and readability were compared between the original and revised guides (Doak, Doak, & Root, 1996).

Results SAM and readability were improved following the revision. Participants in the revised guide group performed significantly better on the utility task and on the Measure of Audiologic Rehabilitation Self-Efficacy for Hearing Aids subscales than participants in the original guide group.

Conclusions These results are encouraging as they indicate that there is scope to influence self-efficacy and utility performance through the use of appropriate HAUGs.

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