Can Bone Conduction Thresholds Really Be Poorer Than Air? T he questions you raise are good ones, Mike, and they are just as timely and valid today as when they were first articulated decades ago. Studebaker (1967)  penned a classic position paper challenging the widespread belief, then as now, that bone-conduction (BC) thresholds cannot be poorer than air-conduction (AC) ... Clinical Focus: Consult
Clinical Focus: Consult  |   November 01, 1994
Can Bone Conduction Thresholds Really Be Poorer Than Air?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. Joseph Barry, PhD
    Acting Chief, Audiology and Speech Pathology (126), DVA Medical Center, 1 Freedom Way, Augusta, GA 30904-6285
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus: Consult   |   November 01, 1994
Can Bone Conduction Thresholds Really Be Poorer Than Air?
American Journal of Audiology, November 1994, Vol. 3, 21-22. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0303.21
History: Received November 5, 1993 , Accepted December 14, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1994, Vol. 3, 21-22. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0303.21
History: Received November 5, 1993; Accepted December 14, 1993
T he questions you raise are good ones, Mike, and they are just as timely and valid today as when they were first articulated decades ago. Studebaker (1967)  penned a classic position paper challenging the widespread belief, then as now, that bone-conduction (BC) thresholds cannot be poorer than air-conduction (AC) thresholds. He noted that proponents of this position assert that the AC threshold is a measure of the sensitivity of the entire auditory system and that the BC threshold is a measure of the sensitivity of only part of the system. They argue that a loss in part of the system cannot exceed the loss in the entire system, so that BC thresholds cannot exceed AC.
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