Investigating the Knowledge, Skills, and Tasks Required for Hearing Aid Management: Perspectives of Clinicians and Hearing Aid Owners Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify hearing aid owners' and clinicians' opinions of the knowledge, skills, and tasks required for hearing aid management and the importance of each of these to overall success with hearing aids. Method Concept mapping techniques were used to identify key ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 08, 2018
Investigating the Knowledge, Skills, and Tasks Required for Hearing Aid Management: Perspectives of Clinicians and Hearing Aid Owners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca J. Bennett
    Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco
    Ear Sciences Centre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands
  • Carly J. Meyer
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Robert H. Eikelboom
    Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco
    Ear Sciences Centre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa
  • Marcus D. Atlas
    Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco
    Ear Sciences Centre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Rebecca Bennett: bec.bennett@earscience.org.au
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Editor: Ryan McCreery
    Editor: Ryan McCreery×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 08, 2018
Investigating the Knowledge, Skills, and Tasks Required for Hearing Aid Management: Perspectives of Clinicians and Hearing Aid Owners
American Journal of Audiology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 67-84. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0059
History: Received June 21, 2017 , Revised August 9, 2017 , Accepted August 9, 2017
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 67-84. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0059
History: Received June 21, 2017; Revised August 9, 2017; Accepted August 9, 2017
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify hearing aid owners' and clinicians' opinions of the knowledge, skills, and tasks required for hearing aid management and the importance of each of these to overall success with hearing aids.

Method Concept mapping techniques were used to identify key themes, wherein participants generated, sorted, and rated the importance of statements in response to the question “What must hearing aid owners do in order to use, handle, manage, maintain, and care for their hearing aids?” Twenty-four hearing aid owners (56 to 91 years of age; 54.2% men, 45.8% women) and 22 clinicians (32 to 69 years of age; 9.1% men, 90.9% women) participated.

Result Participants identified 111 unique items describing hearing aid management within 6 concepts: (a) “Daily Hearing Aid Use,” (b) “Hearing Aid Maintenance and Repairs,” (c) “Learning to Come to Terms with Hearing Aids,” (d) “Communication Strategies,” (e) “Working With Your Clinician,” and (f) “Advanced Hearing Aid Knowledge.” Clinicians' opinions of the importance of each statement varied only slightly from the opinions of the hearing aid owner group. Hearing aid owners indicated that all 6 concepts were of similar importance, whereas clinicians indicated that the concept “Advanced Hearing Aid Knowledge” was significantly less important than the other 5 concepts.

Conclusion The results highlight the magnitude of information and skill required to optimally manage hearing aids. Clinical recommendations are made to improve hearing aid handling education and skill acquisition.

Acknowledgments
R. Bennett is funded by an Australian Postgraduate Award scholarship through The University of Western Australia. Portions of this article were presented at the World Congress of Audiology, Vancouver, Canada, September 20, 2016, and at the Audiology Australia National Conference 2016, Melbourne, Australia, May 23, 2016. The authors would like to acknowledge the assistance of Unitron Australia, the Lions Hearing Clinic, the Communication Research Registry with participant recruitment, and the participants for devoting their time to this study. The authors would like to thank Unitron Australia and the Ear Science Institute Australia for the financial support of this project.
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