Validation of the Chinese Sound Test: Auditory Performance of Hearing Aid Users Purpose The Chinese Sound Test (Hung, Lin, Tsai, & Lee, 2016) has been recently developed as a modified version of the Ling Six-Sound Test (Ling, 2012). By incorporating Chinese speech sounds, this test should be able to estimate whether the listener can hear across the Chinese speech spectrum. To establish ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   March 08, 2018
Validation of the Chinese Sound Test: Auditory Performance of Hearing Aid Users
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yu-Chen Hung
    Speech and Hearing Science Research Institute, Children's Hearing Foundation, Taipei, Taiwan
  • Ya-Jung Lee
    Speech and Hearing Science Research Institute, Children's Hearing Foundation, Taipei, Taiwan
  • Li-Chiun Tsai
    Speech and Hearing Science Research Institute, Children's Hearing Foundation, Taipei, Taiwan
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Yu-Chen Hung: yuchenhung@chfn.org.tw
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Editor: Lauren Calandruccio
    Editor: Lauren Calandruccio×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / International & Global / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   March 08, 2018
Validation of the Chinese Sound Test: Auditory Performance of Hearing Aid Users
American Journal of Audiology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 37-44. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0057
History: Received June 16, 2017 , Revised October 30, 2017 , Accepted November 14, 2017
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 2018, Vol. 27, 37-44. doi:10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0057
History: Received June 16, 2017; Revised October 30, 2017; Accepted November 14, 2017

Purpose The Chinese Sound Test (Hung, Lin, Tsai, & Lee, 2016) has been recently developed as a modified version of the Ling Six-Sound Test (Ling, 2012). By incorporating Chinese speech sounds, this test should be able to estimate whether the listener can hear across the Chinese speech spectrum. To establish the clinical validity of the test, this study examined the relationship between the aided audiometric thresholds and the distance thresholds.

Method Sixty children with bilateral hearing aids were recruited. The aided sound-field thresholds at 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, and 6000 Hz were compared with the distance thresholds of six sounds, /u, ə, a, i, tɕʰ, and s/, which encompass the entire Chinese speech frequency range from low to high.

Results Partial correlation and stepwise regression analyses revealed that the Chinese testing sounds are frequency specific and that the audibility of each sound could be predicted by a specific frequency threshold.

Conclusions The results confirm the validity of the Chinese Sound Test, indicating that the testing sounds can be reliably used to assess the perception of frequency-specific information. Crucially, these data also demonstrate that the Chinese Sound Test is a useful tool to identify red flags of poor auditory access in daily environment to monitor device malfunctions and possible hearing fluctuations.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a research grant to Yu-Chen Hung from the Children's Hearing Foundation. The authors would like to thank audiologists Ying-Chuan Julie Ma, Grace Lin, Yen-Ming Chang, and Tsung-Hui Yang, who performed the audiometric tests of the participants. We also thank the participating families and children.
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