Audiology Students' Perspectives of Enacting and Learning Clinical Communication: A Qualitative Interview and Video Reflexivity Study Purpose Effective clinical communication is pivotal to the provision of quality hearing health care. To date, audiology students reportedly felt ill-prepared when counseling patients about their hearing impairment, yet there is a paucity of studies exploring how clinical communication is taught and learned in audiology programs. Thus, the aims of ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   March 27, 2018
Audiology Students' Perspectives of Enacting and Learning Clinical Communication: A Qualitative Interview and Video Reflexivity Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Samantha Tai
    The HEARing Cooperative Research Center, Carlton, Victoria, Australia
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Robyn Woodward-Kron
    Department of Medical Education, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Caitlin Barr
    The HEARing Cooperative Research Center, Carlton, Victoria, Australia
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Samantha Tai: Samantha.tai@unimelb.edu.au
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Editor: Lauren Calandruccio
    Editor: Lauren Calandruccio×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   March 27, 2018
Audiology Students' Perspectives of Enacting and Learning Clinical Communication: A Qualitative Interview and Video Reflexivity Study
American Journal of Audiology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJA-17-0097
History: Received October 6, 2017 , Revised December 7, 2017 , Accepted January 13, 2018
 
American Journal of Audiology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJA-17-0097
History: Received October 6, 2017; Revised December 7, 2017; Accepted January 13, 2018

Purpose Effective clinical communication is pivotal to the provision of quality hearing health care. To date, audiology students reportedly felt ill-prepared when counseling patients about their hearing impairment, yet there is a paucity of studies exploring how clinical communication is taught and learned in audiology programs. Thus, the aims of the study were (a) to explore final year audiology students' perspectives of their own clinical communication skills during an in-house university clinical placement and (b) to explore students' perceptions of their clinical communication education.

Method Using a qualitative description approach, students were asked to coview their filmed clinical encounter using video reflexivity during a semistructured interview on clinical communication education. Fifteen final year graduate audiology students from The University of Melbourne, Australia, participated in the study. The interviews were audio-recorded and analyzed thematically.

Results The overarching themes of striving to be patient-centered, assessment shapes behavior, and power relations emerged from students' reflection of their own clinical encounter. In addition, the theme what students want described the perceived teaching methods that assisted students' clinical communication practices.

Conclusions The findings of this study highlight the challenges that students perceived during their clinical placement as they strive to enact a patient-centered interaction. An assessment rubric that incorporates communication skills can provide greater opportunities for feedback and self-reflection. Additionally, clinical communication education that adopts experiential learning and is longitudinally integrated into the curriculum can further reinforce students' communication learning needs.

Acknowledgments
The authors acknowledge the financial support of the HEARing Cooperative Research Centres (CRC), established under the CRC Programme. The CRC Programme supports industry-led, end user–driven research collaborations to address the major challenges facing Australia.
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