Immediate Passage Comprehension and Encoding of Information Into Long-Term Memory in Children With Normal Hearing: The Effect of Voice Quality and Multitalker Babble Noise Purpose This study examines how voice quality and multitalker babble noise affect immediate passage comprehension and the efficiency of information encoding into long-term memory in children with normal hearing. Method Eighteen children (mean age = 9 years) with normal hearing participated. Immediate passage comprehension performance and delayed performance ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   May 03, 2018
Immediate Passage Comprehension and Encoding of Information Into Long-Term Memory in Children With Normal Hearing: The Effect of Voice Quality and Multitalker Babble Noise
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • K. Jonas Brännström
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Lund University, Sweden
  • Heike von Lochow
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Lund University, Sweden
    Linneaus' environment Cognition, Communication and Learning, Lund University, Sweden
  • Viveka Lyberg Åhlander
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Lund University, Sweden
    Linneaus' environment Cognition, Communication and Learning, Lund University, Sweden
  • Birgitta Sahlén
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Lund University, Sweden
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jonas Brännström: jonas.brannstrom@med.lu.se
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Editor: Monita Chatterjee
    Editor: Monita Chatterjee×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   May 03, 2018
Immediate Passage Comprehension and Encoding of Information Into Long-Term Memory in Children With Normal Hearing: The Effect of Voice Quality and Multitalker Babble Noise
American Journal of Audiology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJA-17-0061
History: Received June 26, 2017 , Revised October 26, 2017 , Accepted January 31, 2018
 
American Journal of Audiology, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_AJA-17-0061
History: Received June 26, 2017; Revised October 26, 2017; Accepted January 31, 2018

Purpose This study examines how voice quality and multitalker babble noise affect immediate passage comprehension and the efficiency of information encoding into long-term memory in children with normal hearing.

Method Eighteen children (mean age = 9 years) with normal hearing participated. Immediate passage comprehension performance and delayed performance (after 5 to 8 days) were assessed for 4 listening conditions: a typical voice in quiet, a typical voice in noise, a dysphonic voice in quiet, and a dysphonic voice in noise.

Results Multitalker babble noise had a significant effect on immediate and delayed performance. This effect was more pronounced for delayed performance. No significant main effect of voice quality was seen on immediate or delayed performance.

Conclusions Multitalker babble noise impairs immediate passage comprehension and encoding of information into long-term memory for later recall in children with normal hearing. In learning situations where competing speech signals are present, background noise may reduce the prerequisites for optimal learning.

Acknowledgments
This study was partially financed by the Linneaus' environment Cognition, Communication and Learning at Lund University, grant 349-2007-8695, and the Hearing Foundation, grant 2014-436 awarded to K. J. Brännström (Hörselfonden–Hörselskadades Riksförbund). The authors report no conflict of interest and are alone responsible for the content and writing of the article. The authors like to extend their gratitude to the participating children and the staffs at the participating schools.
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