The Role of Audiologists in Assuring Follow-Up to Outpatient Screening in Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Systems Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of audiology involvement and other factors associated with failure to follow through from the initial hearing screening to the second outpatient screen. Method Linear regression, logistical regression, and descriptive analyses were used across demographic and hospital variables ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 12, 2018
The Role of Audiologists in Assuring Follow-Up to Outpatient Screening in Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Systems
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vickie Thomson
    Department of Otolaryngology, University of Colorado Denver
  • Christine Yoshinaga-Itano
    Institute of Cognitive Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Vickie Thomson: Vickie.Thomson@ucdenver.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit (Sumit) Dhar
    Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit (Sumit) Dhar×
  • Editor: Ryan McCreery
    Editor: Ryan McCreery×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Healthcare Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 12, 2018
The Role of Audiologists in Assuring Follow-Up to Outpatient Screening in Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Systems
American Journal of Audiology, September 2018, Vol. 27, 283-293. doi:10.1044/2018_AJA-17-0113
History: Received January 18, 2018 , Revised April 5, 2018 , Accepted April 10, 2018
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2018, Vol. 27, 283-293. doi:10.1044/2018_AJA-17-0113
History: Received January 18, 2018; Revised April 5, 2018; Accepted April 10, 2018

Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of audiology involvement and other factors associated with failure to follow through from the initial hearing screening to the second outpatient screen.

Method Linear regression, logistical regression, and descriptive analyses were used across demographic and hospital variables associated with infants who did not receive a follow-up outpatient screen.

Results The results included birthing hospital outpatient rescreen rates from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2005. Variables were collected from the birth certificate and hospital surveys. Results showed higher loss to follow-up/documentation to outpatient screen for (a) infants born in hospitals with low rates for returning for follow-up, (b) infants born in hospitals that did not have an audiologist involved, (c) infants who were Hispanic, (d) infants who were born to mothers who were not married, (e) infants with mother's with < 12 years of education, and (f) infants with Apgar scores of 7 or below.

Conclusions The findings were used to identify quality improvement strategies to decrease the loss to follow-up. Strategies included ensuring audiology support, providing information in the parent's native language, educating personnel in the newborn intensive care units, developing and disseminating information in Spanish in written form, and educating hospitals on the importance of scheduling the outpatient rescreening before hospital discharge.

Acknowledgments
Funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from 2000 to 2016, awarded to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment made this research possible. This research was supported by the Disability Research and Dissemination Center through its Cooperative Agreement 5U01DD001007, by the Association of University Centers on Disabilities, and by the CDC, to the University of Colorado Boulder. Its contents are solely responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of HRSA, MCHB, Disability Research and Dissemination Center, the Association of University Centers on Disability, or CDC.
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