Negative Association of Hepatitis B Virus With Hearing Impairment Purpose Hearing impairment is one of the most common chronic diseases causing deterioration of the quality of life in elderly individuals. Several viral infections have been suggested to cause hearing impairment. We investigated association of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection with hearing impairment using a representative sample of the Korean ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 12, 2018
Negative Association of Hepatitis B Virus With Hearing Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • SKM Azizul Islam
    Medical Institute of Dongguk University, Gyeongju, South Korea
    Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Dongguk University, Gyeongju, South Korea
  • Jin Wook Chung
    Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Dongguk University, Gyeongju, South Korea
  • Young-Sil Lee
    Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Dongguk University, Gyeongju, South Korea
  • HoChan Cho
    Department of Internal Medicine, Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu, South Korea
  • Seong-Su Moon
    Medical Institute of Dongguk University, Gyeongju, South Korea
    Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Dongguk University, Gyeongju, South Korea
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Seong-Su Moon: drmoonss@hanmail.net and HoChan Cho: ho3632@naver.com
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit (Sumit) Dhar
    Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit (Sumit) Dhar×
  • Editor: Ryan McCreery
    Editor: Ryan McCreery×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 12, 2018
Negative Association of Hepatitis B Virus With Hearing Impairment
American Journal of Audiology, September 2018, Vol. 27, 324-332. doi:10.1044/2018_AJA-17-0092
History: Received September 18, 2017 , Revised February 27, 2018 , Accepted May 7, 2018
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2018, Vol. 27, 324-332. doi:10.1044/2018_AJA-17-0092
History: Received September 18, 2017; Revised February 27, 2018; Accepted May 7, 2018

Purpose Hearing impairment is one of the most common chronic diseases causing deterioration of the quality of life in elderly individuals. Several viral infections have been suggested to cause hearing impairment. We investigated association of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection with hearing impairment using a representative sample of the Korean population.

Method Participants included 6,583 men and 8,702 women, who were ≥ 20 years of age from the Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys of the Korean population (2010–2012). Air-conduction pure-tone thresholds were measured in a soundproof booth using an automatic audiometer for each ear at 6 frequencies (500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, and 6000 Hz). An audiometric test and a laboratory examination, including an HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) test, were performed.

Results Subjects who are HBsAg positive had lower average of pure-tone thresholds and lower prevalence of hearing impairment at both low/mid and high frequency compared with those without. Adjusted means of hearing thresholds were also lower among subjects who are HBsAg positive compared with subjects who are HBsAg negative. After the adjustment for age and gender, the odds of high-frequency mild hearing impairment were lower for subjects with HBV infection. In the multiple logistic regression analyses adjusting for confounding variables, the significant negative association between HBV infection and high-frequency mild hearing impairment still remained.

Conclusions Contrary to previous reports, subjects who are HBsAg positive had a lower prevalence of hearing impairment compared with subjects who are HBsAg negative. Further studies are warranted to investigate the underlying mechanism regarding their negative relationship.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Dongguk University research fund (awarded to Seong-Su Moon) and the research-promoting grant from the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center in 2011 (awarded to HoChan Cho). We are thankful to the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare and Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for providing the invaluable data for the survey.
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