Author Response to Peck (2018), “Questionable Use of ‘Nonorganic’ in ‘Estimating Nonorganic Hearing Thresholds’” Purpose The purpose of this letter is to respond to Dr. Peck's (2018)  letter to the editor regarding the use of the term “nonorganic” to describe hearing loss, demonstrated by the pure tone audiogram that cannot be explained or is greater than what can be explained by a physiological auditory ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   September 12, 2018
Author Response to Peck (2018), “Questionable Use of ‘Nonorganic’ in ‘Estimating Nonorganic Hearing Thresholds’”
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda W. Norrix
    Department of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Thomas Muller
    Department of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Linda W. Norrix: norrix@email.arizona.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit (Sumit) Dhar
    Editor-in-Chief: Sumitrajit (Sumit) Dhar×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   September 12, 2018
Author Response to Peck (2018), “Questionable Use of ‘Nonorganic’ in ‘Estimating Nonorganic Hearing Thresholds’”
American Journal of Audiology, September 2018, Vol. 27, 368-369. doi:10.1044/2018_AJA-18-0071
History: Received April 30, 2018 , Accepted May 3, 2018
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2018, Vol. 27, 368-369. doi:10.1044/2018_AJA-18-0071
History: Received April 30, 2018; Accepted May 3, 2018

Purpose The purpose of this letter is to respond to Dr. Peck's (2018)  letter to the editor regarding the use of the term “nonorganic” to describe hearing loss, demonstrated by the pure tone audiogram that cannot be explained or is greater than what can be explained by a physiological auditory disorder.

Conclusions We prefer the term “nonorganic” rather than the term “false and exaggerated hearing loss.” “Nonorganic,” in our view, is a nonjudgmental term and, as stated by Austen and Lynch (2004), implies “as little as possible about its cause” (p. 450).

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