Evaluating Hearing Aid Management: Development of the Hearing Aid Skills and Knowledge Inventory (HASKI) Purpose Although hearing health care clinicians provide training on hearing aid handling and management as part of the rehabilitation program, clinical studies suggest that the level of management skill demonstrated by hearing aid owners is low. In the absence of a comprehensive clinical survey to identify these shortfalls in clinical ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 12, 2018
Evaluating Hearing Aid Management: Development of the Hearing Aid Skills and Knowledge Inventory (HASKI)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca J. Bennett
    Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco
    Ear Sciences Centre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands
  • Carly J. Meyer
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Robert H. Eikelboom
    Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco
    Ear Sciences Centre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa
  • Marcus D. Atlas
    Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco
    Ear Sciences Centre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Rebecca Bennett: bec.bennett@earscience.org.au
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sumittrajit (Sumit) Dhar
    Editor-in-Chief: Sumittrajit (Sumit) Dhar×
  • Editor: Ryan McCreery
    Editor: Ryan McCreery×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 12, 2018
Evaluating Hearing Aid Management: Development of the Hearing Aid Skills and Knowledge Inventory (HASKI)
American Journal of Audiology, September 2018, Vol. 27, 333-348. doi:10.1044/2018_AJA-18-0050
History: Received February 24, 2018 , Revised April 11, 2018 , Accepted May 7, 2018
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2018, Vol. 27, 333-348. doi:10.1044/2018_AJA-18-0050
History: Received February 24, 2018; Revised April 11, 2018; Accepted May 7, 2018

Purpose Although hearing health care clinicians provide training on hearing aid handling and management as part of the rehabilitation program, clinical studies suggest that the level of management skill demonstrated by hearing aid owners is low. In the absence of a comprehensive clinical survey to identify these shortfalls in clinical training, the objective of this study was to develop and report the psychometric properties of the Hearing Aid Skills and Knowledge Inventory (HASKI: a self-administered version and a clinician-administered version). The HASKI evaluates the knowledge and skills required for hearing aid management. A secondary aim was to report the prevalence of hearing aid management difficulties in an Australian population.

Method The development of the HASKI and the investigation of its psychometric properties in a prospective convenience cohort of 518 adult hearing aid owners, ranging in age from 18 to 97 years (M = 71 years, SD = 14), 60% male, 38% female, and 2% undisclosed, recruited from 7 hearing clinics across Australia, were used.

Results The HASKI (both the self-administered and clinician administered) demonstrated high internal consistency, interdimensional relationships, construct validity, test–retest reliability, interobserver reliability, and criterion validity. A range of aptitudes were observed from low to full competency, with 99% of participants indicating difficulty with at least 1 item on the survey.

Conclusions The Hearing Aid Skills and Knowledge Inventories are valid and reliable measures of hearing aid handling and management skills with good potential for use in clinical settings. Hearing aid management is an area of difficulty for the majority of hearing aid owners, indicating the need for clinicians to improve the efficacy of hearing aid management training delivered.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank the Ear Science Institute Australia for the financial support of this project. R. Bennett is funded by an Australian Postgraduate Award scholarship through The University of Western Australia. The authors would like to acknowledge the seven hearing clinics involved for their assistance with participant recruitment and the participants for devoting their time to this study. The authors report no declarations of interest. Portions of this article were presented at the ACAud National Congress of Audiology, Adelaide, Australia, August 2017, and at the Audiology Australia Chapter Conferences, Perth, Adelaide, and Hobart, Australia, November 2017.
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